University of South Carolina Upstate - Plagiarism Prevention Workshop
  1. Welcome to the University of South Carolina Upstate's Plagiarism Prevention Workshop!

    After you complete this module, you will be able to:
    • Define plagiarism and describe its importance.
    • Avoid plagiarizing.
    • Understand the concept of common knowledge.
    • Use paraphrasing and quotes properly with correct citations.

    To begin this workshop, please enter your information into the boxes below. Click the button at the bottom when you're ready to begin. Allow yourself up to two hours to complete the workshop.

    Please note: Fields marked with an * are required.

  2. Name:*
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  3. Course Name & Number:*
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  4. Professor's Name:*
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  5. Your Email:*
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  6. Your Professor's Email:
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  7.  
  1. Instructions: This workshop will begin with a Pre-Test to gauge your knowledge on the material. Then will proceed through 4 sections: What is Plagiarism?, Paraphrasing, Common Knowledge, and Citations. Each section will begin with helpful text and videos. Be sure to pay close attention when reading the text and watching the videos, as you will immediately be tested on the material. At the conclusion of the 4 sections, you will be given a Post-Test to gauge your overall retention of the material.

    Please note: There are no "previous" buttons in this module. Once you leave a section and begin the quiz, you will not able to return. So be sure to read all of the material and watch all of the videos thoroughly before proceeding to the quiz. For questions about this workshop, please contact Lola Bradley at lbradley@uscupstate.edu or Bree Kirsch at bkirsch@uscupstate.edu. If you have research questions, feel free to Ask a Librarian.

  2.  
  1. There are 15 questions in this Pre-Test.
  2. Question 1: True or False? Sculptures and other artwork do not need to be cited.



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  1. Not quite! Sculptures and other artwork do need to be cited.

  2. That's right! Sculptures and other artwork do need to be cited.

  3.  
  1. Question 2: True or False? When you write a paraphrase, you must put everything 100% into your own words.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. While the definition of paraphrasing is putting the author's ideas into your own words, some of the words must remain the same, such as the names of states or years.

  2. That's right. While the definition of paraphrasing is putting the author's ideas into your own words, some of the words must remain the same, such as the names of states or years.

  3.  
  1. Question 3: True or False? Common knowledge is never published in encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, or other reference materials.



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  1. Not exactly. Reference materials often contain common knowledge information.

  2. That's right. Reference materials often contain common knowledge information.

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  1. Question 4: True or False? Putting incorrect information into a citation, even by accident, is plagiarism.



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  1. That's right. Even if it is an accident, putting incorrect information into a citation is considered plagiarism.

  2. Not exactly. Even if it is an accident, putting incorrect information into a citation is considered plagiarism.

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  1. Question 5: True or False? It is important to pay attention to your audience when deciding what is considered common knowledge.



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  1. Not exactly. The average size of the tibia may be common knowledge to the medical community, but not necessarily to a group of interior designers.

  2. That's right. The average size of the tibia may be common knowledge to the medical community, but not necessarily to a group of interior designers.

  3.  
  1. Question 6: True or False? Students should only cite a source when they use somebody else's exact words, but not if they are only using somebody else's ideas.



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  1. Not exactly. You should always cite your source when using somebody else's ideas.

  2. That's right. You should always cite your source when using somebody else's ideas.

  3.  
  1. Question 7: True or False? To properly paraphrase, you must include a citation both in the text of the paper and in the list of references.



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  1. Not exactly. Every citation should be included in both the text of your paper and in your list of references.

  2. That's right. Every citation should be included in both the text of your paper and in your list of references.

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  1. Question 8: True or False? A citation styles library guide includes information about MLA and APA styles.



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  1. Not exactly. Both MLA and APA styles are included in a citation styles library guide.

  2. That's right. Both MLA and APA styles are included in a citation styles library guide.

  3.  
  1. Question 9: True or False? For citing Internet webpages, the date it was last updated is not important.



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  1. Not exactly. The date an Internet webpage was last updated is very important to include in your citation.

  2. That's right. The date an Internet webpage was last updated is very important to include in your citation.

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  1. Question 10: True or False? Something is common knowledge when it is available in many different sources or known by many people.



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  2.  
  1. That's right. Common knowledge information is available in many different sources or known by many people.

  2. Not exactly. Common knowledge information is available in many different sources or known by many people.

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  1. Question 11: True or False? Quotes should never be used with paraphrases when writing a paper.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. To paraphrase is to take someone else's ideas and put them in your own words. A citation is still necessary, but quotes are not.

  2. That's right. To paraphrase is to take someone else's ideas and put them in your own words. A citation is still necessary, but quotes are not.

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  1. Question 12: "On 22 May 1718, Blackbeard appeared off Charles Town (now Charleston), in the province of South Carolina... A string of sandbars separated Charles Town harbour from the ocean, and so, by guarding the only gap in the bar that could be used by large ships, Blackbeard managed to blockade the port." - This is a quote from page 192 of Piracy: The Complete History by Angus Konstam. Choose the best paraphrase from the following choices:





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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. When paraphrasing, you are taking someone else's ideas and putting them in your own words. Good practice is to read the passage, then repeat the intent of the passage from memory.

  2. That's right. Paraphrasing expresses the same idea from a passage, but in your own words.

  3.  
  1. Question 13: You completed a paper about trees in South Carolina. Which of the following ideas that you use in the paper is common knowledge? The information that is not common knowledge can be found on the following website: http://www.sciway.net/sc-photos/tag/sc-trees/.





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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Common knowledge would be the state tree of South Carolina.

  2. That's right. Common knowledge would be the state tree of South Carolina.

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  1. Question 14: All of the following are best practices for paraphrasing, except...





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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Indenting a passage if it is more than 7 lines long is not best practices when paraphrasing.

  2. That's right. Indenting a passage if it is more than 7 lines long is not best practices when paraphrasing.

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  1. Question 15: Which one of the following do you NOT need to cite?





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  2.  
  1. That's right. You do not need to cite common knowledge.

  2. Not exactly. You do not need to cite common knowledge.

  3. This concludes the Pre-Test. Your combined scores will be revealed at the end. Click the button below to learn about plagiarism.

  4.  
  1. Read through the text and watch the videos about plagiarism below. When you're ready, click the button at the bottom to begin the What is Plagiarism? Activity.


    Types of Plagiarism

    The following Types of Plagiarism are quoted from the Quick Guide to Plagiarism Video:
    • Denny's Sampler - The writer tries to disguise plagiarism by copying from several different sources, tweaking the sentences to make them fit together while retaining most of the original phrasing. [For the purposes of this workshop, we will use the term "copy and paste" plagiarism for this type.]
    • Ghost Writer - The writer turns in another's work, word-for-word, as his or her own.
    • Photocopy - The writer copies significant portions of text straight from a single source, without alteration.
    • Remix - Although the writer has retained the essential content of the source, he or she has altered the paper's appearance slightly by changing key words and phrases. [For the purposes of this workshop, we will use the term "word switch" plagiarism for this type.]
    • Misinformer - The writer provides inaccurate information regarding the sources, making it impossible to find them.

    All of the following are considered plagiarism:
    • Turning in someone's work as your own.
    • Failing to put a quotation in quotation marks.
    • Copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit.
    • Giving incorrect information about the source of the quotation.
    • Changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit.

    One additional type of plagiarism is self-plagiarism. This is when the writer uses a previous assignment or essay they created for a new assignment.

    A Quick Guide to Plagiarism Video

    Avoiding Plagiarism

    Advice from students. "On the Advice poster, students offered practical tips for future students to improve the quality of their writing, including:
    1. Start the research project early.
    2. Write a page or two a day and leave time to edit.
    3. Plan to finish 2 to 3 days early so you will actually finish on time.
    4. For each paper, write a draft, print it out and attack it with a corrective pen. Be merciless!
    5. Go to the Writing Center/professor/peer mentor for help.
    6. Proof read out loud. It makes all the difference.
    7. Don't take the optional extensions on deadlines. They are like crack! Totally addictive! They start a domino effect."

    Reference: Bleicher, Elizabeth. "The Last Class: Critical Thinking, Reflection, Course Effectiveness, and Student Engagement." Honors in Practice 7 (Annual 2011): 39-51. Academic OneFile. Web 6 Dec 2011.

    Importance of Plagiarism

    Refer to the Code of Academic Integrity in the USC Upstate Student Handbook. For more details and other items that fall under academic integrity, please see p. 134-135. Important points are as follows:
    1. "Under the Code of Academic Integrity, students are on their honor not to cheat, lie or steal, and if they witness another student doing so, it is their responsibility to report the individual and the circumstances to the instructor or the dean of students."
    2. Plagiarism: Plagiarism, or literary theft, in any writing assignment: using others' words or ideas without consistent, correctly formatted acknowledgement. This includes sources the student knows personally (friends, other students, relatives, etc.) as well as all text, Internet, and other sources. Students are required to properly acknowledge sources as follows: students may not present as their own ideas, opinions, images, figures, languages or concepts of another, including those of other students.
    3. Sanctions of Academic Integrity: Violations include, but are not limited to:
    • expulsion;
    • indefinite suspension;
    • definite suspension;
    • "F" assigned for the course;
    • "0" assigned for the assignment, test or paper;

    Plagiarism: Don't Do It Video

  2.  
  1. There are 6 questions in this Plagiarism Activity.
  2. Question 1: Would this action be considered plagiarism? Student Y procrastinated and was not able to collect the appropriate sources for his research paper in Sociology class on time. However, he remembered that he worked on a similar topic in his English 102 class, so he used this paper without the Sociology professor's permission.



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  1. Not quite! Although the paper was written by Student Y, he previously submitted the paper for a different course. He should speak with his Sociology professor before submitting a paper he wrote for a different course.

  2. That's right! Although the paper was written by Student Y, he previously submitted the paper for a different course. He should speak with his Sociology professor before submitting a paper he wrote for a different course.

  3.  
  1. Question 2: Would this action be considered plagiarism? Student Z was interested in getting a good grade on the final paper, but writing was always her weakest point, so she found two anonymous articles online, combined them, used several paragraphs from each article, and presented it as her work.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Presenting someone else's work as your own is always considered plagiarism.

  2. That's right. Presenting someone else's work as your own is always considered plagiarism.

  3.  
  1. Question 3: Would this action be considered plagiarism? To make a presentation at the state conference, Student A interviewed the University president and included his words in her speech. She was permitted to share the president's ideas in her presentation and several times mentioned his name and his citations.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Since Student A received permission from the University president to share his ideas in her presentation, and presented them as his ideas and not her own, this is not considered plagiarism.

  2. That's right. Since Student A received permission from the University president to share his ideas in her presentation, and presented them as his ideas and not her own, this is not considered plagiarism.

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  1. Question 4: Would this action be considered plagiarism? Student X borrowed a paper from his brother who had already graduated from a different college and used it as his own.



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  2.  
  1. That's right. Submitting someone else's work as your own is always considered plagiarism.

  2. Not exactly. Submitting someone else's work as your own is always considered plagiarism.

  3.  
  1. Question 5: Would this action be considered plagiarism? Student Q was taking an advanced biology class with her friend, Student M. They both were to collect data for the lab, but Student Q was busy with other classes and copied Student M's figures.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Submitting someone else's work as your own is always considered plagiarism.

  2. That's right. Submitting someone else's work as your own is always considered plagiarism.

  3.  
  1. Question 6: Would this action be considered plagiarism? In his assignment for the Graphic Design class, Student C found photographs from the Life and Discover magazines. He cited all the images in the bibliography.



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  1. Not exactly. Student C correctly cited all of the images he used for his assignment in the bibliography, therefore this is not considered plagiarism.

  2. That's right. Student C correctly cited all of the images he used for his assignment in the bibliography, therefore this is not considered plagiarism.

  3. This concludes the What is Plagiarism? Activity. Your combined scores will be revealed at the end. Click the button below to learn about paraphrasing.

  4.  
  1. Watch the video about paraphrasing below. When you're ready, click the button at the bottom to begin the Paraphrasing Activity.


    Avoiding Plagiarism in Research Papers with Paraphrasing Video

  2.  
  1. There are 6 questions in this Paraphrasing Activity.
  2. Question 1: Choose the best paraphrase for the following quote:

    "The themes of the Potter novels - and how the books revealed complicated truths about not just adults, school, and coming of age, but things as weighty as death and the scarring nature of loss - struck a deep chord with kids."

    — Fierman, Daniel, et al. "Harry Potter and the Last Hurrah." Entertainment Weekly 3 Aug. 2007: 18-23. Print.





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  1. Not quite! The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.
    For this question, the best paraphrase would be: Truths about growing up, education, adults, death and loss are some of the themes that strongly affected children who read the Harry Potter series.

  2. That's right! The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.

  3.  
  1. Question 2: Choose the best paraphrase for the following quote:

    "Celebrity experience is the object of much public fascination and fantasy ideation. The ideal of becoming rich and famous has become intricately woven into the cultural tapestry of not only the United States, but also most of the Western world. Celebrities come to represent the hopes and dreams of the average citizen."

    — Rockwell, Donna and David C. Giles. "Being a Celebrity: A Phenomenology of Fame." Journal of Phenomenological Psychology. 40.2 (Summer 2009): 178-210. Academic Search Premier. Web. 1 Dec. 2011.





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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.
    For this question, the best paraphrase would be: For years fame has been directly identified with the possessions of high status and considerable wealth.

  2. That's right. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.

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  1. Question 3: Choose the best paraphrase for the following quote:

    "... there's so much of Fillion in the fun-loving mystery writer. The quirks around Castle's edges - from the obsession with gadgets to the clever miming - are vintage Fillion, and while it's the actor who often rides a Xootr scooter to and from his trailer on set, that could just as easily be a trait of man-boy Richard Castle."

    — Bierly, Mandi. "Nathan Fillion Geek God." Entertainment Weekly 25 Mar. 2011: 38-45. Print.





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  1. Not exactly. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.
    For this question, the best paraphrase would be: The television character of Richard Castle is similar in personality to the actor who plays him, Nathan Fillion; they are both obsessed with technological contraptions and miming.

  2. That's right. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.

  3.  
  1. Question 4: Choose the best paraphrase for the following quote:

    "Older adults of both sexes are underrepresented in U.S. popular films and television programs relative to younger age groups, and older women are even less likely to appear on screen than older men (Bazzini and McIntosh, 1997; Sanders, 2002). When older characters are portrayed, women are more frequently depicted in negative stereotypes and shown as less successful compared to older men."

    — Hatch, Lauri Russell. "Gender and Ageism." Generations 29.3 (2005): 19-24. Academic Search Premier. Web. 1 Dec. 2011.





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  1. That's right. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.

  2. Not exactly. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.
    For this question, the best paraphrase would be: Even though younger characters in movies and on TV significantly outnumber elderly characters, they still represent the most successful part of the population.

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  1. Question 5: Choose the best paraphrase for the following quote:

    "Flow, whether in work or relaxation, is only found in the present moment. It is a state we all find when we are fully engaged in what we are doing without drifting to the past or the future. At that moment, no matter what we are doing, be it chores, work, or lying on a beach, the present becomes play." — Seppala, Emma. "Your Soul Needs Playtime." Spirituality & Health Magazine. Spirituality and Health Media, LLC, May-June 2011. Web. 1 Dec. 2011.





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  1. Not exactly. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.
    For this question, the best paraphrase would be: Keeping your mind in the present moment and being fully aware of the job you are performing now will let you experience the joy of life.

  2. That's right. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.

  3.  
  1. Question 6: Choose the best paraphrase for the following quote:

    "But perhaps the most heroic act of all was staying true to Rowling's vision. 'Think about it,' says Columbus. 'If they had cast American actors or put cheerleaders at Hogwarts - and all these hideous ideas were indeed being pitched and discussed at the time - Harry Potter would have been one movie, not a series. It would have died.'"

    Jensen, Jeff. "So Long, Harry." Entertainment Weekly 8 July 2011: 32-35. Print.





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  1. Not exactly. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.
    For this question, the best paraphrase would be: The Harry Potter movies remained true to Rowling's books and as a result, became a bestselling series rather than a single, failed movie.

  2. That's right. The best paraphrase expresses the author's main idea in your own words.

  3. This concludes the Paraphrasing Activity. Your combined scores will be revealed at the end. Click the button below to learn about common knowkedge.

  4.  
  1. Read through the text and watch the videos about common knowledge below. When you're ready, click the button at the bottom to begin the Common Knowledge Activity.


    Common Knowledge Video

    Examples of Common Knowledge

    1. The state bird of South Carolina is the Carolina wren.
    2. Plato spent most of his life in Athens.
    3. Maine has a lower yearly average temperature than Florida.
    4. Capitals of states and countries.

    What is Common Knowledge?

    1. "There is no clear boundary on what is considered common knowledge. Even experts on plagiarism disagree on what counts as common knowledge. For instance, many sources only consider facts - current and historical events, famous people, geographic areas, etc. - to be potentially common knowledge. Others also include nonfactual material such as folklore and common sayings. Some sources limit common knowledge to only information known by others in your class, other sources look at what is common knowledge for the broader subject area.
    2. The two criteria that are most commonly used in deciding whether or not something is common knowledge relate to quantity: the fact can be found in numerous places and ubiquity: it is likely to be known by a lot of people. Ideally both conditions are true. A third criteria that is sometimes used is whether the information can be easily found in a general reference source.
    3. How do you tell if you have met the quantity criteria? Some experts say that a fact is common knowledge if it can be found in three independent sources. Purdue's Online Writing Lab recommends finding five independent sources before considering a fact common knowledge. The point is that common knowledge can be found in a variety of sources. As you do more research on a topic, you are likely to discover which facts count as common knowledge because you will encounter these facts in many places.
    4. How do you tell if a fact is ubiquitous? some facts may be well known within one discipline and papers written within that group may assume the information is commonly known. That same piece of information used in other situations or by 'non-experts' may require attribution. A good rule of thumb is to acknowledge ideas, which are not common knowledge among your peers such as the other students in the course for which you are writing the paper.
    5. How do you know if it is a general reference source? Reference sources collect together facts for easy look-up. Dictionaries, encyclopedias, almanacs, and gazetteers are typical examples. Reference sources that focus on a specific area are not considered 'general.' For example, the definition of Marfan syndrome came from a medical dictionary, a specialized reference source that may not be readily available to most people. Therefore, you would probably want to cite this source if you were writing for people not familiar with medical information.
    6. If you are not sure, assume that an idea is not common knowledge and cite the source. It is much easier to remove a citation that it is to hunt down a citation and try to add it later. Finally, when in doubt, check with your professor."

    Reference: This document was created and updated by Sue Thompson of the Cal State San Marcos Library on February 5, 2008. To see the original document, please go to http://library.csusm.edu/plagiarism/howtoavoid/how_avoid_common.htm.

  2.  
  1. There are 9 questions in this Common Knowledge Activity.
  2. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  3. Question 1: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    There are four seasons in the year.



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  4.  
  1. Not quite! This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. That's right! This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 2: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    GPS along with wireless Internet will help improve traffic congestion.



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  3.  
  1. Not exactly. This opinion would require a citation.

  2. That's right. This opinion would require a citation.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 3: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    You Can't Take It with You (1938) and Meet John Doe (1941) are movies that suggest people are happier if they aren't wealthy and that family is more fulfilling than money.



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  3.  
  1. Not exactly. This opinion would require a citation.

  2. That's right. This opinion would require a citation.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 4: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    The U.S. entered World War II after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.



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  3.  
  1. That's right. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. Not exactly. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 5: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    George Washington was the first president.



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  3.  
  1. Not exactly. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. That's right. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 6: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    On September 11, 2001, New York City and Washington D.C. suffered terrorist attacks.



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  3.  
  1. Not exactly. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. That's right. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 7: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    The motion sensors in virtual reality gloves affect telepresence (illusion of being there).



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  3.  
  1. That's right. This opinion would require a citation.

  2. Not exactly. This opinion would require a citation.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 8: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    The speed of light is 3 x 108 meters/second.



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  3.  
  1. Not exactly. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. That's right. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  3.  
  1. *Please note: All comments requiring a citation are from the Encyclopædia Britannica Online.


  2. Question 9: Would the following comment be considered common knowledge?

    The best known of English dog shows is Crufts.



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  3.  
  1. Not exactly. This opinion would require a citation.

  2. That's right. This opinion would require a citation.

  3. This concludes the Common Knowledge Activity. Your combined scores will be revealed at the end. Click the button below to learn about citations.

  4.  
  1. Read through the text and watch the videos about citations below. When you're ready, click the button at the bottom to begin the Citations Activity.


    Citation Styles

    Click on the link below for a LibGuide on citation styles and how to cite your sources properly using APA or MLA citation styles. For more assistance or information ask a librarian or visit the Writing Center in HPAC 136. You can reach the Writing Center at 864.503.5883.

    Citation Styles LibGuide.

    Create Citations with the Diana Hacker Site Video

    In-Text Citation Video

  2.  
  1. There are 5 questions in this Citations Activity.
  2.  
  1. There are 15 questions in this Post-Test.
  2. Question 1: True or False? A paraphrase is putting someone else's ideas into your own voice and giving credit to the original source.



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  3.  
  1. A paraphrase is putting someone else's ideas into your own voice and giving credit to the original source.

  2. That's right! A paraphrase is putting someone else's ideas into your own voice and giving credit to the original source.

  3.  
  1. Question 2: True or False? Interview responses do not need a citation.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. If it is not your own work, then it requires a citation.

  2. That's right. If it is not your own work, then it requires a citation.

  3.  
  1. Question 3: True or False? It is common knowledge that most people in America consider kittens and puppies to be cute.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. That's right. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  3.  
  1. Question 4: True or False? All sources that are used for paraphrasing should be cited.



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  2.  
  1. That's right. Even if paraphrasing, you must cite someone else's ideas.

  2. Not exactly. Even if paraphrasing, you must cite someone else's ideas.

  3.  
  1. Question 5: True or False? Properly citing sources only requires in-text citations.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Properly citing sources requires citations both in-text and in the bibliography.

  2. That's right. Properly citing sources requires citations both in-text and in the bibliography.

  3.  
  1. Question 6: True or False? Widely known facts should be cited in a paper written for an audience that is familiar with them.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. Common knowledge does not require a citation.

  2. That's right. Common knowledge does not require a citation.

  3.  
  1. Question 7: True or False? Images in creative commons are an example of common knowledge.



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  2.  
  1. Not exactly. While neither requires a citation, images in creative commons are different from common knowledge. A creative commons license means that the owner is allowing use of their image without citation. Common knowledge are facts that are widely known and therefore do not require a citation.

  2. That's right. While neither requires a citation, images in creative commons are different from common knowledge. A creative commons license means that the owner is allowing use of their image without citation. Common knowledge are facts that are widely known and therefore do not require a citation.

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  1. Question 8: True or False? Facts that are considered intellectual property should always be cited.



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  1. Not exactly. Intellectual property should always be cited.

  2. That's right. Intellectual property should always be cited.

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  1. Question 9: True or False? Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, which is common knowledge.



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  1. Not exactly. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

  2. That's right. This fact would be considered common knowledge.

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  1. Question 10: True or False? Quotations add credibility to your writing.



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  1. That's right. Quotations show that you have done your research and can support your ideas.

  2. Not exactly. Quotations show that you have done your research and can support your ideas.

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  1. Question 11: True or False? Using paraphrases of another's ideas does not allow you to write a paper in your own voice.



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  1. Not exactly. To paraphrase is to take someone else's ideas and put them in your own words. Remember: a citation is still necessary.

  2. That's right. To paraphrase is to take someone else's ideas and put them in your own words. Remember: a citation is still necessary.

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  1. Question 12: Which of the following is an example that is NOT common knowledge?





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  1. Not exactly. The Disney song “A Pirate’s Life for Me” from Pirates of the Caribbean is not common knowledge and should be cited.

  2. That is right. The Disney song “A Pirate’s Life for Me” from Pirates of the Caribbean is not common knowledge and should be cited.

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  1. Question 13: Students should use paraphrasing:





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  1. Not exactly. Paraphrasing should be used when it is required, in a literary analysis paper, and to express someone else's idea but not the original language.

  2. That's right. Paraphrasing should be used when it is required, in a literary analysis paper, and to express someone else's idea but not the original language.

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  1. Question 14: Which of the following information is NOT necessary when creating a citation?





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  1. Not exactly. ISBN (International Standard Book Number) and ISSN (International Standard Serial Number) numbers are not necessary to include in citations.

  2. That's right. ISBN (International Standard Book Number) and ISSN (International Standard Serial Number) numbers are not necessary to include in citations.

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  1. Question 15: Citations should be used:





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  1. Not exactly. Citations are used to show intellectual honesty and to refer to sources used in the paper.

  2. That's right. Citations are used to show intellectual honesty and to refer to sources used in the paper.

  3. This concludes the Post-Test. Your combined scores will be revealed at the end. Click the button below for your next steps.

  4.  
  1. Additional Tutorials

    Here are a few links to some tutorials available online about plagiarism. If you want some extra practice, take a tutorial or two. Most of the following tutorials will take you about 20-30 minutes to complete. When you're ready, click the button at the bottom to complete the workshop.

    Diagnosis: Plagiarism
    How to Recognize Plagiarism
    Plagiarism: Avoiding Troubled Waters
    Plagiarism Court: You Be the Judge
    Plagiarism Tutorials
    SFU Library Plagiarism tutorial
    Student Tips for Avoiding Plagiarism
    What Would You Do?
    You Quote It, You Note It